Christine jarvis nurse-Christine Jarvis

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Christine jarvis nurse

This entailed the development of a new academic role, the academic skills tutor, who supports students to ensure they have the generic academic skills needed to succeed. Tatyana Karpenko-Seccombe T. Christine jarvis nurse record the sessions, leading to an enhanced understanding for themselves and for social work students who participated in the Christine jarvis nurse. Material reviewed also included work we came across from reference lists and in Big breast milf tgp own reading, including books, chapters in books and conference papers. Clough hud.

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This Monster! Though she is Christine jarvis nurse to recognize in Civil War 2 Augusteditor Tom Brevoort stated that it was Carter welcoming the superhero team the Young Avengers at the new headquarters. This story shifts from the urban drama of the first three issues and instead features Christine embroiled in a gothic adventure, complete with a foreboding mansion, dusty secret passageways, and mysterious lights. Retrieved November 8, Views Read Edit View history. Archived from the original on July 25, Retrieved Entertainment Weekly. Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa javis, the writer of Nightcrawlersaid he was "a huge fan" of Night Nurseand wanted to bring back the character when he realized that his first Nightcrawler story would take place in a jrvis. The Wrap. They settled in Hartford to start a family and a few years later moved to West Hartford. Stan Lee. While the three roommates initially bicker Christind themselves, they soon bond over their shared loneliness, and Christine jarvis nurse best friends. Raising her two children was her Divas unlimited focus.

Nurses are critical for successfully delivering treatment in nearly all caregiving environments.

  • Looking for an obituary for a different person with this name?
  • Night Nurse is a Marvel Comics comic book series published in the early s, as well as the alter ego later taken on by one of its characters, Linda Carter.

Christine has a particular interest in the transformative potential of fiction, including literature, film and television. Fiction enables learners to have intense vicarious experiences, she believes; in effect it can speed up the process of learning that might occur through ordinary lived experience, enabling learners to have many lives and relationships, including some that are rare and unusual. She is currently working on a chapter outlining the transformative potential of fiction for a handbook in transformative learning that is to be published by Jossey-Bass.

Much of her career has involved promoting widening participation. She worked in further, adult and community education for 12 years and focused extensively on enabling students to make the transition to HE, on developing and teaching access to higher education for mature students from widening participation backgrounds, and on the delivery of higher education programmes in further education.

Her commitment to enabling everyone who is able to benefit to participate in HE led her to design and deliver new courses in FE and HE that would provide access opportunities.

This has included the development of work-based and foundation degrees. She has just completed the development of a CPD framework for the university to enable individuals who may be trapped in low paid work to access personal and professional learning. Christine recognises that widening participation involves ensuring that HE has systems to enable all students to achieve their potential. Between and she managed a Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund project to develop academic skills support.

This entailed the development of a new academic role, the academic skills tutor, who supports students to ensure they have the generic academic skills needed to succeed. Staff and students have found the role so valuable that there are now 14 such tutors in the University of Huddersfield and their work has significantly enhanced the student experience.

She leads an action learning set as part of the university's postgraduate certificate in professional development for HE teachers and enjoys working with new colleagues as they develop their teaching skills. Dr Christine Jarvis. Job title. PVC Teaching and Learning. Institution or Organisation. University of Huddersfield.

Content Classification. National Teaching Fellow Main menu Disciplines Knowledge Hub About.

Give others a chance to express condolences. Maybe the comic-book format just didn't appeal to that group. Retrieved September 14, Retrieved July 20, Archived from the original on December 11, Retrieved June 11,

Christine jarvis nurse

Christine jarvis nurse

Christine jarvis nurse

Christine jarvis nurse

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Anne had a keen intellect and had many interests; cooking, gardening, traveling, CT beaches and CA deserts, politics, sports Yankees, tennis, paddle tennis. Funeral services will be held Monday, July 23, at 11 a. Calling hours will be held prior to the service from a. Interment will follow in Center Cemetery. Remember Share memories or express condolences below. She approached life with vitality and enthusiasm. I will miss her very Give others a chance to express condolences.

Share on Facebook. Funeral Etiquette. Add the email addresses of friends or family members you'd like to notify about this obituary.

Your email was sent successfully. He wanted to do some books that would have special appeal to girls. We were always looking for way to expand our franchise. My idea The series was written by writer Jean Thomas, who was at the time married to Roy Thomas, and by artist Winslow Mortimer.

This story shifts from the urban drama of the first three issues and instead features Christine embroiled in a gothic adventure, complete with a foreboding mansion, dusty secret passageways, and mysterious lights.

Issue 4 was also the last of the series. In a interview, Jean Thomas offered her theory on the series's early cancellation:. Maybe the comic-book format just didn't appeal to that group. It may also have been difficult to distribute or display: too serious to be with romance comics but not male-action oriented enough to be with superhero comics , so, regrettably, low sales led to cancellation.

Linda Carter reappeared as a medical professional specializing in helping injured superheroes in Daredevil vol. Night Nurse co-star Christine Palmer reappeared in Nightcrawler vol. Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa , the writer of Nightcrawler , said he was "a huge fan" of Night Nurse , and wanted to bring back the character when he realized that his first Nightcrawler story would take place in a hospital. A one-shot issue , Night Nurse vol. While the three roommates initially bicker amongst themselves, they soon bond over their shared loneliness, and become best friends.

Linda Carter is the daughter of a doctor in Allentown, New York. After moving to New York City and moving in with roommates Christine Palmer and Georgia Jenkins, she meets and falls in love with Marshall Michaels, a wealthy businessman. When he forces her to choose between marrying him or staying at Metro General as a nurse, she chooses her career. By the time the series was canceled, she had started a budding romance with Dr.

Jack Tryon, a young resident doctor. Carter reappears in Daredevil vol. Though she is difficult to recognize in Civil War 2 August , editor Tom Brevoort stated that it was Carter welcoming the superhero team the Young Avengers at the new headquarters. Carter then treated the ninja assassin Elektra , who had been severely wounded after being abducted and tortured by the shapeshifting alien Skrulls during the Skrull Invasion.

After Elektra's subsequent imprisonment by the newly formed H. Georgia Jenkins is an African-American nurse who comes from an inner city neighborhood, blocks away from Metro General Hospital. On her days off from work, she provides free medical care to the people on her old block. She discovers that her older brother Ben was conned into nearly blowing up the hospital generator. She angrily compares the harshness of his sentence to the fact that powerful mob criminals walk around freely.

Christine Palmer leaves her home in "an exclusive Midwestern suburb" against her father's wishes, intending to "make a new life without her father's money". William Sutton. When Dr. Sutton's career ends in disaster, she leaves New York City and her friends behind, and travels the country, finding a job as a private nurse for a paraplegic at a spooky mansion.

However, this particular position is short-lived. It is revealed in the Nightcrawler series that her mother lives in Tucson, Arizona. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Marvel comics. Cover for Night Nurse 1 Nov. Art by Win Mortimer. Main article: Marvel Cinematic Universe. Don Markstein's Toonopedia. Archived from the original on April 13, Retrieved July 20, Back Issue! TwoMorrows Publishing 44 : Night Nurse". TwoMorrows Publishing 95 : Retrieved June 11, Comic Book Resources.

Retrieved

Christine Jarvis : Official Guides to the City of London

To browse Academia. Skip to main content. You're using an out-of-date version of Internet Explorer. By using our site, you agree to our collection of information through the use of cookies. Log In Sign Up. Christine Jarvis. Patricia A. The Role of the Arts in Professional Education. Vincent University Abstract Many educators of professionals use arts-based approaches, but often explore this within the confines of their own professional disciplines.

This paper consists of a thematic review of the literature on arts and professional education, which cuts across professional disciplines in an attempt to identify the specific contribution the arts can make to professional education.

The review identified five broad approaches to the use of the arts in professional education: exploring their role in professional practice, illustrating professional issues and dilemmas, developing empathy and insight, exploring professional identities and developing self-awareness and interpersonal expression.

Arts-based approaches may help learners to make a critical assessment of their own roles and identities within professions, and to consider the impact of professions in shaping the broader society. Purpose of the review Professional studies programs have grown in importance in adult and higher education.

The emphasis has historically been pragmatic, with learners expected to develop clearly articulated skills related to workplace needs. The impact of globalisation, rapidly evolving technologies and shifting workplace contexts has led, however, to what Barnett refers to as a time of supercomplexity. Educators need to prepare professionals to develop the capacity to work in fluid, changing, and uncertain circumstances. The use of the arts in professional studies may be one way to engage learners in developing the creative, critical and self-reflective capabilities they will need.

We believe that reviewing this work across a range of professional disciplines will assist in disseminating the multifarious uses of the arts in professional education, and in exploring the nature of their distinctive contribution.

We organised the material we reviewed into five categories reflecting their use in professional education: 1. Learning to use arts in professional practice 2. Using arts to illustrate complex concepts and dilemmas 3. Arts for empathy and insight 4. The role of the arts in the construction of professional identities and discourses 5. Arts, self-awareness and interpersonal skill development Two related themes — epistemological challenge and critical social perspectives cut across these categories.

In this way the arts appear to help professionals cope with change and uncertainty. We discuss these two inter-related themes, epistemological challenge and critical social perspective, before going on to outline the conduct of the review and to summarise each of the five categories. Epistemological Challenge: Questions of knowledge and identity There is a substantial literature on the professions, which we cannot address fully, but which needs some discussion to secure the case for the particular value of the arts at this time and in this global context.

Barnett argues: …the hard-pressed professional is faced with an identity crisis. Is professionalism a matter of being a knowledgeable expert or of meeting clients' wants or of managing resources efficiently or of entrepreneurial nous? Is it a private, a public, a bureaucratic or a performative mode of being that is called for? He contends that professionals have to operate within multiple discourses of professionalism. This suggests that effective professionals must recognise how such discourses construct the many, often contradictory expectations placed on them.

Professionals are faced with a range of solutions to the challenges their expertise is meant to address. Multiple, even contradictory solutions could be characterised as right, depending on the perspective taken, the discourses in operation and the ethical framework adopted.

The arts challenge our epistemological perspectives by developing tolerance for ambiguity Eisner, , which facilitates the management of those multiple discourses and ill- structured problems. When we engage with or create art we use our senses to make one thing represent another — things are not always what they seem and our interpretive faculties can produce many meanings from one work of art.

Art can break through our preconceptions and enable us to accept that there may be multiple interpretations of an apparently simple object or situation.

Artistic practice is often inherently experimental, having an infinite array of possible outcomes and through art one is also encouraged to explore complex and diverse situations. Eisner , p. Arts expose them to the constructive nature of meaning making, so that they recognise how individuals read the world differently from within their own frame of reference. Professionals need to work closely and effectively with groups and individuals with varying, often contradictory, world views and value systems.

This suggests that a capacity to accept and identify differing interpretations of reality is central to successful professional practice, given the increase in diversity in workplaces. Arts based education is integral to the development of cognitive and affective orientations that facilitate this precisely because openness to multiple perspectives, contradictory meaning and the creative processes involved in making meaning is central to critical engagement with the arts.

He draws upon Marcuse to discuss the revolutionary potential of art. The value of the arts is perceived to be linked to the dissonance or sense of estrangement that is part of a deep aesthetic experience.

Revolutionary or critical thought is difficult to engender without this openness to alternative perspectives. When one is immersed in music, enthralled by a play, buried in a novel, or captivated by an artistic masterpiece, mental space opens up that creates the possibility for deeper, critical thought.

These categories are useful in considering the different strategies used in professional educational programs. Technical-rational learning is characterised by a means-end approach that is predominant in many professional educational contexts as it is outcome driven, with an emphasis on measurement and accountability. The arts may be used to foster better insights into the circumstances of people in marginalised positions, or create awareness of issues pertaining to equity and fairness.

Such educators may not label their work as having a social justice orientation or link it to the idea of initiating broader social change. The intent is to create deeper personal insights to inform the role of professional health care provider, educator, or social worker and to shape their practice in the field. There is a well- established tradition in adult education of using the arts to challenge oppression and inequalities and effect social change Clover and Stalker, This last level is the one that is the least developed in the area of professional studies.

The objective is for learners to think critically about meeting corporate goals. Students are encouraged to understand the complexity of human interaction, to reflect upon their own experiences and understanding of leadership, and focus on learning effective communication.

This is not surprising to critical adult educators who argue that neoliberalism shapes current learning environments, emphasising individualism, competition, and marketplace values. Policy in the UK, for example, has focused on employer-led vocational and professional education Thompson, , accompanied by a marginalisation of professionals themselves and the education community that trains them in decision making about professional roles and standards.

In our review we found that many papers did have a critical social perspective, albeit not always fully articulated. We began by using combinations of terms: arts and professional education, named arts e. While this highlighted hundreds of possibilities, follow-up scrutiny revealed only 26 items that focused primarily on arts and professional education.

We knew there would be many pieces this approach would miss. We knew that titles, abstracts and keywords referenced specific arts or particular sub-branches of professions and we could not determine all the permutations of profession and artistic method or product that might be used for educational purposes.

Although professional education is addressed by adult educators, research and experimental practice in professional education is also often conducted within specific professional disciplines and reported in specialist publications relating to those professions.

We could not do individual searches of each of the hundreds of professional journals published. In addition, therefore, to searching six leading adult education journals Adult Education Quarterly, Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, International Journal of Lifelong Education, Journal of Vocational Education and Training, Studies in the Education of Adults from for articles dealing with the arts and professional education, we sampled a wide range of journals, which between them covered education for nursing, business, management, law and teaching.

We also selected three journals dealing with teaching in Higher Education that offered a range of articles on using the arts. Material reviewed also included work we came across from reference lists and in our own reading, including books, chapters in books and conference papers.

Our focus was not on being comprehensive, therefore. We aimed for representativeness by ensuring we looked at journals that focused on a range of professions. We considered that we had achieved saturation in our reading when we stopped finding rationales, methods and outcomes that were significantly different.

In one sense, saturation could never be achieved. Each individual work of art contributes to the learning of students studying it in its own particular way, and each group of students responds differently.

We did find, however, that we could identify five broad approaches to arts-based professional education and that eventually, new approaches did not emerge.

The final number of articles, books, papers and chapters we read and analysed came to We undertook an inductive thematic analysis Braun and Clarke, of the finally selected material. Braun and Clarke focus on psychology, but acknowledge that their approach is appropriate for qualitative research generally. They offer a systematic approach without being overly prescriptive. We followed the five broad steps they outline — familiarising ourselves with the literature, generating initial codes, identifying themes and revising themes.

By reading and rereading their empirical materials, they try to pin down their key themes and, thereby, to draw a picture of the presuppositions and meanings that constitute the cultural world of which the textual material is a specimen. In the case of a literature review, the literature itself is the data; by looking at these publications as a whole, we sought to identify patterns and themes across a wide range of materials.

The approach we took to coding and categorisation was interpretive and conceptual, rather than semantic; we looked for underlying ideas and concepts guiding the use of the arts, rather than commonalities in method or client group. Our theoretical position acknowledges that this is our interpretation of this material, in line with our own personal and theoretical orientations. The systematic approach we took to reading, re-reading and reviewing themes aimed to ensure that our interpretations had validity in that we could demonstrate that the patterns we identified were firmly based in the materials themselves.

Space constraints make discussing every example impossible; we use a sample from a range of different professions and sources. Fourteen focused on showing teachers, including adult educators, how they might use arts in their work. Seven addressed medical and health care professionals; one addressed youth workers, and one addressed marketing students.

Educators encourage trainee professionals to experience and practise the arts to develop a deep understanding of the potential of the arts in their professional work and to build confidence in working with arts and artists.

Both Davies and Donahue and Stuart consider the use of arts in pre-service teacher-training. Davies discusses the incorporation of an arts week into the curriculum. His experience suggests that trainee professionals need to experience arts directly in order to be confident enough to use arts in their practice.

Mark is also concerned that educators move beyond skills-based approaches and supports literacy educators in using creative arts to explore inequality and injustice and engage the whole person.

Nurse educators support nurses to explore how art can promote health and recovery in patients. Coghlan and Igo, ; Gersie and King, ; Robinson, Ting, Chen, Ho and Gaufberg reported on incorporating analyses of hospital art into their work with medical students to help them develop a deeper understanding of the impact of environment on patients. In so doing they re-evaluate their own profession, review the experiences of their clients and patients, and learn to understand their own feelings, which helps them realise the potential the arts have for their work with others.

Wikstrom discusses how student nurses, focusing on their own positive memories of aesthetic experiences in a structured way, learned how such memories evoked happiness and awareness, and could be of value to patients in clinical settings. Aspects of the principles and practice of art therapy find their way into the work of professionals such as teachers, youth workers, educational psychologists and education professionals specialising in behaviour management and support.

Cumming and Visser evaluated the impact of arts workshops run by the Devon Behaviour Support Team on the self-esteem and social skills of refugee children from countries affected by war.

Christine jarvis nurse