Occupational therapy hiv-HIV Occupational Therapists – Birmingham Heartlands HIV Service

Community pharmacists: Underutilized resources in the HIV care team. This content is potentially out of date. CATIE cannot assure the accuracy or completeness of this information. The impact of living with HIV disease can make certain everyday tasks and activities difficult. This chapter discusses rehabilitation services for people living with HIV and offers some suggestions about how to lessen the physical, mental, emotional and social challenges of living with this disease.

Occupational therapy hiv

Occupational therapy hiv

Occupational therapy hiv

Occupational therapy hiv

Related Articles. You can conserve or increase your energy level by following the Five Ps of energy conservation. Exercising with hand and ankle weights or weight machines can increase your strength and reduce pain. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our privacy Occupational therapy hiv. She also volunteered for 2 years before she became employed with the agency. TreatmentUpdate Biktarvy and Dovato. He did his internal medicine training at the University of Saskatchewan therpy then received his infectious diseases training at the University of Calgary.

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Salary and workforce survey: Executive summary. Blood or visibly hkv fluids or other potentially infectious material e. Occupational Occupationao can be approached individually and collectively. Substantial efavirenz resistance Occupational therapy hiv to be found in community HIV isolates. In addition to staff who are clearly employed by an organization e. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I therapu. References Black RJ. Also see Cardo et al. This course is designed for occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants who have the background Due pregnancy required for working with individuals with neurobiological disorders such as ADHD. Post-exposure services for exposures to all bloodborne pathogens include but are not limited to: Post-exposure evaluation and follow-up post-exposure vaccinations Arrangements for a full course of post-exposure prophylaxis Occupatinoal, at no cost to the employee Care provided under the supervision of a licensed physician or other licensed healthcare professional Availability of a rapid HIV test for source Occupational therapy hiv testing Supportive counseling Federal law requires covered employers to ensure that all medical evaluations and procedures, vaccines, and post-exposure prophylaxis are made available to the employee within a reasonable time and at a reasonable location and are made available at no cost to the employee OSHA, 29 CFR, Occupaitonal Occupational therapists work with infants, toddlers, children, youth, and their families in a variety of settings, including schools, clinics, homes, hospitals, and the community.

Am J Occup Ther ;41 7

  • This was a unique opportunity because I am studying to be an occupational therapist, and there has never before been an occupational therapist at HIV Community Link.
  • This continuing education package for
  • Occupational therapy OT is the use of assessment and intervention to develop, recover, or maintain the meaningful activities, or occupations , of individuals, groups, or communities.
  • Fort Sam Houston, TX

Community pharmacists: Underutilized resources in the HIV care team. This content is potentially out of date. CATIE cannot assure the accuracy or completeness of this information. The impact of living with HIV disease can make certain everyday tasks and activities difficult. This chapter discusses rehabilitation services for people living with HIV and offers some suggestions about how to lessen the physical, mental, emotional and social challenges of living with this disease.

Perhaps you have tingling or numbness in your feet, pain in your legs or arms, or feel weak and tired when you try to stand, climb stairs or walk for any length of time. Many of these problems were described in Chapter 11, Side effects and symptoms. This chapter about rehabilitation will suggest ways to reduce many of the health- and life-related challenges of living with HIV. You know better than anyone that living with HIV presents many challenges. These may include challenges to your physical, mental, emotional or social health, and may be due to HIV infection itself or its associated treatments.

Perhaps there are activities you can no longer participate in or which you can no longer do. You may not think of these as disabilities. But, in the world of rehabilitation, disability is a much broader concept. A disability is a health-related challenge that interferes with meaningful, active living. You may have experienced this—periods of wellness and then periods of illness.

The uncertainty of not knowing when an episode might arise and how severe that episode might be are challenges commonly faced by people living with HIV.

In addition, since anti-HIV drugs are helping people to live longer, you may begin to experience common diseases of aging such as heart disease, diabetes, cognitive changes and arthritis.

No matter whether these other conditions are caused by HIV, your anti-HIV drugs or the aging process, they can still compound the physical and mental challenges of living with HIV.

Back to top. This list covers some of the health challenges that rehabilitation services can help with. Rehabilitation is any service or activity that can address or prevent the health-related challenges or disabilities that people living with HIV might face. Rehabilitation is an important component of the best care for many common diseases such as arthritis, heart disease and diabetes.

In these diseases, rehabilitation is not only used as a treatment, but also to prevent new conditions from developing, or current ones from worsening. Research has shown that rehabilitation interventions like stress management, maintaining a healthy weight and regular exercise can prevent or reduce the severity of many diseases.

Rehabilitation is about helping people to manage their health problems. It also means providing support so that people can be included in their communities while continuing to live as independently as possible. Rehabilitation services can include physiotherapy, occupational therapy or speech—language therapy, as well as complementary or alternative therapies such as acupuncture, massage therapy and counselling. To address the different types of health-related challenges you may face, there are several different types of rehabilitation and rehabilitation providers.

A physical therapist physiotherapist can work with you to develop strategies that can help you with:. An occupational therapist can help you learn to manage your daily activities and make adjustments in your home or workplace to allow for any physical changes you are experiencing. This could include:. A physiatrist is a doctor who specializes in physical medicine and rehabilitation.

A physiatrist can help you with:. People living with HIV can experience stress, anxiety, depression, changes in sleep and appetite and reduced sex drive libido. Self-esteem and relationships also can be affected. Psychiatrists, psychologists, psychotherapists, occupational therapists and mental health counsellors can help by:. Social supports, such as friends, family, cultural and other community organizations, can also provide both emotional and practical support. Some people with HIV also find that complementary or alternative therapies are helpful to address the many physical, mental or emotional challenges they face.

These include:. Staying in the workforce, or returning to the workforce after a period of illness, is often complicated if you have HIV. If you have been on long-term disability benefits and return to work, you may be concerned about income or health benefits if you get sick again.

Occupational therapists, vocational rehabilitation programs and some AIDS service organizations provide:. Rehabilitation professionals may work alone, but are commonly part of a larger team, including physicians, nurses, social workers, dietitians, pharmacists, substance use counsellors and community workers. It is important to talk to your doctor about all of the challenges you experience in your day-to-day life—physical, mental, emotional, financial or work-related.

Many of these challenges can be addressed by various types of rehabilitation or support. In rehabilitation, the person living with HIV is a central part of the process. Therefore, you will be encouraged to play an active role in your care. The place where services are provided will depend on the services available, the medical stability of your illness and your desired and expected outcomes. You will need an assessment and referral by a doctor to access many rehabilitation services.

The types of rehabilitation services paid for by public government health plans in Canada vary from province to province. Private employer or individual health insurance plans often cover some rehabilitation services, but there is usually a yearly maximum or a maximum per treatment, which may mean that you have to pay some of the costs with the insurance provider.

Provincial health plan: If you receive rehabilitation services while you are in hospital, they are covered by your provincial health plan. If you continue to receive rehabilitation from the hospital in an ambulatory or outpatient clinic after you leave, it may also be covered.

However, even if you have a plan through your employer, there are usually yearly maximums and sometimes only a portion of the cost is covered. Check your plan. Sliding fee scales: Some rehabilitation providers have a sliding fee scale for people without insurance. Despite the importance of rehabilitation for people living with HIV and the increasing number of persons who may require rehabilitation, access to rehabilitation services continues to be a challenge across Canada.

For example, some provinces have removed certain rehabilitation services from public coverage. This can create a significant burden for those individuals who can only access rehabilitation services through publicly funded channels.

Among the many emerging issues relating to HIV and rehabilitation, a few have been identified as particularly important to the overall health of people with HIV:. Many people living with HIV find it difficult to work or to work full time.

If your health status is changing monthly or daily, work may not be possible for you or it may be difficult to accommodate. Income security having a reliable and predictable source of income is a major source of stress for many people living with HIV. It can have a major impact on your health. Many people must rely on health and disability benefits such as:. These benefits programs are described in detail in Chapter 20 Money matters.

Rules and definitions vary between programs. Your local AIDS service organizations, occupational therapist or doctor may be able to provide you with information, explain what benefits you are entitled to and help you fill out any necessary forms. It is important to ask for this information and assistance. You have a right to this information; however, research has shown that many people do not receive this information unless they ask about it. In addition to working with rehabilitation professionals, there are many important components of rehabilitation you can start yourself.

These include regular exercise, approaches for managing fatigue, such as energy conservation see the Five Ps of energy conservation , and strategies to help with changes in your thinking and mental health.

If you have HIV, you may get tired easily. You can conserve or increase your energy level by following the Five Ps of energy conservation. Pacing : Break large tasks into several smaller ones. Do some jobs today and some another day.

Positioning : Use correct posture and body positions while sitting, standing, taking part in recreational or other activities—even sleeping. Make sure beds, chairs, desks, tables and computer keyboards are at a comfortable height.

Planning : Make a list of things you have to do during the day. Keep the work you need to do close by and organized. Eliminate less important things or ask someone to help you with them. Pushing instead of pulling; using two hands instead of one? Some people experience changes to their brain, which can affect their thinking and their emotional state.

You may find that your judgment, attention, focus, motivation and ability to deal with emotional situations have changed. You may also experience some form of depression, anxiety or difficulty coping with the life changes resulting from your illness. Research studies have shown that aerobic and resistive exercise training is safe and may be beneficial for people living with HIV who are medically stable.

Before you start to exercise, it is important to gear any exercise program to your physical capabilities and personal goals. Be sure to talk with your doctor, physical therapist or other healthcare provider to find out which program might be right for you.

Rehabilitation professionals often recommend:. Work up to exercising for a total of at least 30 minutes, three to five times a week. Three minute periods of exercise a day work just as well as one minute session. Exercising with hand and ankle weights or weight machines can increase your strength and reduce pain.

Some people find it easier to exercise in warm water. Many community recreation centres have warm water exercise programs. Pool programs geared towards arthritis or osteoporosis may be especially beneficial for persons living with HIV. Many people with HIV will live a long time, thanks to new drug treatments. However, this may put you at risk for developing other conditions associated with aging, or other longer-term side effects of HIV treatments.

Rehabilitation can play an important role in the management of all these conditions. You may also be able to access rehabilitation services targeted specifically to these conditions for example, you may be able to access arthritis rehabilitation therapy services if you have a diagnosis of arthritis in addition to HIV.

Pequegnat W, Stover E. The exam and course evaluation for on-demand courses must be completed within 30 days of course registration. NTD may have already occurred, and the added risk in the remaining weeks of the first trimester may be slight. Regardless of whether the exposed worker accepts or declines PEP treatment, if the post-exposure evaluation determines that PEP is indicated, repeat HIV testing at 4 weeks and 12 weeks should be obtained. However, the best regimen or duration of therapy is unknown, and no data currently exist for treating acute infection with newer direct-acting HCV antiviral therapy.

Occupational therapy hiv

Occupational therapy hiv. Risk Factors Associated with HIV Transmission

I would like to thank everyone at HIV Community Link for welcoming me, taking the time to help me discover what occupational therapy can offer at this agency, and supporting my development as a student.

I wish you all the best! Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists What is occupational therapy? Working at HIV Community Link fits perfectly with my skill set as a psychotherapist and gives me a fabulous opportunity to further my knowledge, education and experience. With a Masters of Counseling I am given the opportunity to enhance my two areas of specialization; bereavement and as a sex psychotherapist.

The diversity, resilience and openness of the community members is a cherished aspect of my position. I appreciate the transparency, non-judgemental, open and welcoming work environment for both clients and staff. I am honored and often find myself humbled when clients share their stories and truly thankful to be a part of their journey. She brings with her a combined 25 years of business experience working with and in various sized companies focusing on maximizing the value of those around her, providing thought leadership, and removing obstacles to enable growth.

Kevin feels very fortunate in having the opportunity to work for HIV Community Link, as he has seen what good they have done in the advancement of Harm Reduction in his hometown of Medicine Hat. Janak is a public health researcher with a background in tropical medicine and global health. Janak is passionate about bringing change in the lives of people living with HIV by implementing programs related to harm reduction, health promotion and disease prevention.

Janak is currently working on his Ph. Gord is a country boy at heart, growing up on the Southern Prairies of Saskatchewan. Gord identifies as a Two Spirited Metis male. It has taken her six years to get to this level of trust and she loves it! Ana started her career in journalism in in Europe, where she enjoyed covering social and diversity issues. Katelyn is passionate about creating social change that positively impacts populations health.

She comes from a background in public health, she has experiences working in sexual health, harm reduction, and population health promotion. She also volunteered for 2 years before she became employed with the agency. She enjoys her job very much, as she has met so many wonderful people over the last 18 years, staff and clients alike.

She has watched the agency grow and change over the years always on top of any change and needs our clients require. Coral also coordinates the nutrition program. Mark a has been living with HIV since He has traveled a long road from the time of no treatment options to the reality today that treatment works and undetectable equals untransmittable.

He has done this in order to educate, inform with facts and work to remove the stigma and discrimination that remain entrenched at many levels of policy, law, community and service access points for people at risk for and living with HIV.

Kemi believes respectful engagement with local communities is critical to the success of any project and long term operations. Mike Miller leads the Health Technology practice for EY Canada as well as the Advisory Analytics practice for Alberta bringing over 15 years of experience in data management, data integration, health informatics and data analytics.

He is passionate about helping organizations solve complex business problems through the use of enabling technologies. Jack Janvier is an infectious disease specialist who is based out the Peter Lougheed Center. He did his internal medicine training at the University of Saskatchewan and then received his infectious diseases training at the University of Calgary.

He has been working full time in Calgary since He has also been involved in an advisory role for collaborative teams looking at tackling the HIV epidemic in Aboriginal populations in Saskatchewan. Jonathan M.

Ablett is a business and real estate lawyer presently working with Quarry Park Law in Calgary. Jon obtained his degree with a dual area of concentration in both Management and Organizational Studies and Economics from the University of Western Ontario, and further completed his law degree at the University of Alberta in Edmonton.

He was called to the Alberta Bar in Jon enjoys outdoor activities of all kinds, and presently also volunteers with the Kerby Centre in Calgary. Presently, Mr. The uncertainties that are occasionally associated with a given exposure may complicate the decision-making process, especially for an inexperienced clinician, and may possibly delay prompt initiation of PEP.

Figure 1 is meant to serve as a general guide. Optimal management of the exposed worker following an occupational exposure to a bloodborne pathogen balances the benefits of preventing infection with the risks of medication-induced side effects and toxicity. Exposed sites should be cleansed of contaminated fluid as soon as possible after exposure.

Wounds and skin sites are best cleansed with soap and water, avoiding irritation of the skin. Exposed mucous membranes should be flushed with water. Alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, Betadine or other chemical cleansers are best avoided. Squeezing the wound may promote hyperemia and inflammation at the wound site, potentially increasing systemic exposure to HIV if present in the contaminating fluid.

Whenever a worker has been exposed to potentially HIV-infected blood, visibly bloody fluids, or other potentially infectious material through the percutaneous or mucocutaneous routes or through non-intact skin see below , PEP is indicated. Exposed workers should be counseled that it is in their best interest to receive a baseline HIV test to document their HIV status at the time of the exposure. In the rare event of seroconversion following an occupational exposure, a negative baseline test is the only way to show that the worker was infected as a result of the exposure.

Baseline HIV testing of the exposed worker is also used to identify individuals who were already infected with HIV at the time of the exposure. However, the PEP regimen should not be discontinued until the positive result is repeated with a confirmatory assay. Antiretroviral drug resistance in human immunodeficiency virus-infected source patients for occupational exposures to healthcare workers.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; HIV virions can traverse epithelial barriers in just hours, and many antiretroviral drugs require an intracellular activation step that delays the onset of antiviral activity.

Therefore, every effort should be made to initiate PEP as soon as possible and ideally within 2 hours. An absolute elapsed time after which PEP should not be administered cannot be stated with certainty. Black RJ. Animal studies of prophylaxis. Efficacy of postexposure prophylaxis after intravaginal exposure of pig-tailed macaques to a human-derived retrovirus human immunodeficiency virus type 2.

Effectiveness of postinoculation R 2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl adenine treatment for prevention of persistent simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmne infection depends critically on timing of initiation and duration of treatment. Two doses of PMPA protect newborn macaques against oral simian immunodeficiency virus infection. Prophylactic and therapeutic benefits of short-term 9-[2- R - phosphonomethoxy propyl]adenine PMPA administration to newborn macaques following oral inoculation with simian immunodeficiency virus with reduced susceptibility to PMPA.

Medical Care Criteria Committee , updated May Drug interactions: The potential for drug interactions in patients receiving protease inhibitors is increased due to the extensive cytochrome P interactions.

For example, proton pump inhibitors may adversely affect the absorption of atazanavir. Clinicians should assess for potential interactions before prescribing a PEP regimen. Other alternative PEP regimens are listed above and may be acceptable in certain situations. It should be recognized that this agent has greater potential for drug interactions and side effects than raltegravir, dolutegravir, or the preferred protease inhibitors darunavir, atazanavir, or fosamprenavir; with each protease inhibitor taken with ritonavir mg daily , with little added efficacy benefit expected.

Recent studies have demonstrated decreasing protease inhibitor resistance among HIV strains [Pacquet et al. Although this Committee recommends a three-drug regimen, the PEP regimen could be reduced to a two-drug regimen if tolerability was a concern.

Use of a two-drug regimen would be preferred to discontinuing the regimen completely. Baeten J. HIVinfected adults. Abstract MOAX Serious adverse events attributed to nevirapine regimens for postexposure prophylaxis after HIV exposures: Worldwide Preexposure chemoprophylaxis for HIV prevention in men who have sex with men.

Raltegravir, tenofovir DF, and emtricitabine for post-exposure prophylaxis to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV: Safety, tolerability, and adherence. Raltegravir-emtricitabine-tenofovir as HIV nonoccupational post-exposure prophylaxis in men who have sex with men: Safety, tolerability and adherence. Dolutegravir with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate-emtricitabine as HIV postexposure prophylaxis in gay and bisexual men.

Abstract H During the PEP treatment period, other blood tests may be indicated to monitor for side effects of treatment. The timing and specific testing indicated varies based on the PEP regimen used see Table 1. Post-exposure care involves simultaneous attention to multiple issues: the emotional state of the exposed worker, adherence to the PEP regimen, monitoring for potential adverse effects, and sequential HIV testing to exclude acquisition of infection.

Clinicians should be aware of the resources within the community that offer medical and counseling services needed following occupational exposure. Consultation with a clinician experienced in managing PEP should occur when switching to an alternative regimen due to tolerability or resistance. When workers are potentially exposed to HIV, longitudinal medical follow-up is necessary regardless of whether PEP is initiated or completed, in order to test sequentially for HIV infection.

HIV seroconversion will generally occur within 2 to 4 weeks if chronic HIV infection develops after an exposure. Point-of-care HIV tests are slightly less sensitive than laboratory-based HIV tests; therefore, exposed workers should be tested with laboratory-based HIV tests whenever possible.

Late seroconversion i. It is unclear if these rare events were related to the original or subsequent exposures. Taking into consideration the infrequency of this occurrence, the increased sensitivity of standard HIV tests to detect early infection and seroconversion, and the added anxiety and significant consequences of an additional 3 months of precautions and testing for exposed workers, this Committee believes that the benefit of routinely testing all workers for HIV at 6 months is outweighed by the negative consequences of routinely extending post-exposure HIV follow-up testing to 6 months.

Patients acutely infected with HIV will often experience at least some symptoms of the acute retroviral syndrome. Fever and flu- or mono-like symptoms are common in acute HIV infection but are nonspecific. Acute HIV infection is often not recognized in the primary care setting because of the similarity of the symptom complex with that of the flu or other common illnesses.

When infection occurs and a 3rd-generation ELISA antibody test is used, it will generally be positive within 3 weeks of the onset of symptoms and is virtually always positive within 3 months following exposure. When acute HIV infection is suspected based on the clinical scenario or when there is a discrepancy between screening and confirmatory serologic testing, plasma HIV RNA assay should be obtained to diagnose HIV infection.

Duration of time between exposure and seroconversion in healthcare workers with occupationally acquired infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

Infant feeding and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus in the United States. Tolerability and side effects of post-exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection. Simultaneous transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus from a needle-stick injury. Initiation of PEP at any time during pregnancy requires a careful discussion of the risks and benefits. Although birth defects and adverse effects on human fetuses have generally not been associated with the antiretroviral agents that are currently available, exposure of a fetus to antiretroviral agents during pregnancy carries a theoretical risk of teratogenicity.

Initiation of PEP in exposed workers who are breastfeeding requires careful discussion. Both HIV and antiretroviral drugs may be found in breast milk; therefore, breastfeeding should be avoided for 3 months after the exposure to prevent HIV transmission and potential drug toxicities [Committee on Pediatric AIDS ].

Clinicians should discuss the risks and benefits with the exposed worker. Pediatrics ;; The risk of HCV infection following a needlestick is 1. The risk of transmission of HCV from a single mucous membrane exposure is negligible. Currently, no effective prophylaxis for HCV has been identified. However, the best regimen or duration of therapy is unknown, and no data currently exist for treating acute infection with newer direct-acting HCV antiviral therapy.

Whether standard interferon, or pegylated-interferon with or without ribavirin, or treatment with direct-acting antiviral agents is used will depend on the individual scenario, as there have been no randomized, controlled trials to guide this decision.

Factors that may increase the risk of sexual transmission include sex with multiple partners, history of STIs, including HIV, or any other practice that might disrupt mucous membranes. The potential need for mental health counseling should be anticipated and offered as needed.

The ELISA test is highly sensitive but relatively nonspecific, resulting in a low positive predictive value in low-prevalence populations. Risk and management of blood-borne infections in health care workers. Recommendations for preventing transmission of infections among chronic hemodialysis patients. Treatment of acute hepatitis C with interferon alfa-2b. Language regarding potential increased risk of neural tube defects with dolutegravir DTG -based ART regimens was added throughout the guideline for clarity, some changes in blue :.

We are very grateful for feedback on the website and on your experience and would appreciate it if you would complete our brief survey.

Yes, I will give feedback—take me to the survey now. The Committee further emphasizes recommendations regarding the importance of initiating occupational PEP as soon as possible, ideally within 2 hours of exposure. A first dose of PEP should be offered while evaluation is underway. Baseline HIV testing of the exposed worker should always be obtained after an occupational exposure, even if the exposed worker declines PEP.

Regardless of whether the exposed worker accepts or declines PEP treatment, if the post-exposure evaluation determines that PEP is indicated, repeat HIV testing at 4 weeks and 12 weeks should be obtained. For pregnant women already taking DTG who present to care in the first trimester of pregnancy, patient-centered counseling should address the risks and benefits of continuing DTG or switching regimens and include the following information: The importance of accurate gestational dating as neural tube development is complete by 28 days post-conception or 6 weeks after the first day of the last menstrual period.

NTD may have already occurred, and the added risk in the remaining weeks of the first trimester may be slight. A background risk of NTD ranging from 0. Changing ART regimens in pregnancy is often associated with viral rebound that may increase the risk of perinatal HIV transmission. Clinicians facing challenges associated with a three-drug regimen might consider a two-drug regimen in consultation with an expert.

A first dose of PEP should be offered to the exposed worker while the evaluation is underway. Decisions regarding initiation of PEP beyond 36 hours post exposure should be made on a case-by-case basis with the understanding of diminished efficacy when timing of initiation is prolonged. Biting: Negligible [Pretty et al. Odds ratios are for the odds of seroconversion after exposure in workers with the risk factor as compared with those without it.

Rationale for PEP Medical Care Criteria Committee , October Several clinical studies have demonstrated that HIV transmission can be significantly reduced by the post-exposure administration of antiretroviral agents. Employer Responsibilities As part of a comprehensive plan to prevent the transmission of bloodborne pathogens, employers should implement the use of safety devices and educate workers about how to prevent needlestick injuries.

A3 Antiretroviral medications for PEP should be readily available to exposed workers who sustain a potential occupational exposure to HIV. Exposed workers should not be expected to pay out-of-pocket for PEP, even if it is reimbursed at a later date. Appendix: Employer Issues and Responsibilities with Post-Exposure Management October Organizations that employ health professionals or other persons who are at risk for occupational exposure to blood, body fluids, or other potentially infectious materials are generally required to establish policies and procedures that guide the management of such exposures.

Definition of Persons Covered New York State regulations apply to staff, employees, or volunteers in the performance of employment or professional duties who work in: A medical or dental office. Emergency response employee paid or volunteer, including an emergency medical technician, a firefighter, a law enforcement officer or local correctional officer, or medical staff.

Access to Occupational Health Services Exposed workers who sustain an occupational exposure should be ensured access to post-exposure services within 1 to 2 hours of a reported event. Post-exposure services for exposures to all bloodborne pathogens include but are not limited to: Post-exposure evaluation and follow-up post-exposure vaccinations Arrangements for a full course of post-exposure prophylaxis medications, at no cost to the employee Care provided under the supervision of a licensed physician or other licensed healthcare professional Availability of a rapid HIV test for source patient testing Supportive counseling Federal law requires covered employers to ensure that all medical evaluations and procedures, vaccines, and post-exposure prophylaxis are made available to the employee within a reasonable time and at a reasonable location and are made available at no cost to the employee OSHA, 29 CFR, Part The source patient should be tested as soon as possible to determine HIV infectivity.

Patient authorization for release of this information is not required for necessary communication of information from provider to provider for timely treatment of the exposed worker. A2 Management of the Exposed Site Body sites exposed to potentially infectious fluid should be cleansed immediately. Wound and skin exposure sites should be washed with soap and water. When the source person does not have the capacity to consent, consent may be obtained from a surrogate, or anonymous testing may be done if a surrogate is not immediately available.

Clinicians should follow individual institutional policies for obtaining consent. If the source patient consents to HIV testing and the HIV screening test is positive, this preliminary result should be utilized in decision-making regarding PEP for the exposed worker.

Rehabilitation program for persons living with HIV/AIDS

This was a unique opportunity because I am studying to be an occupational therapist, and there has never before been an occupational therapist at HIV Community Link. So occupational therapists look at the things that prevent people from participating in the activities that they need, or want, to do and creatively look for ways to overcome those barriers.

These activities include anything you might do in a day, from making a meal, getting to appointments, doing a hobby, volunteering or working. Barriers can include environmental factors, physical limitations, cognitive changes, or mental health conditions.

Occupational therapy can provide services at HIV Community Link through meeting with clients to enable participation in valued activities, partnering with community agencies to provide appropriate services, or by developing resources on topics such as stress management, coping, energy conservation, or coping with cognitive changes CWGHR, I would like to thank everyone at HIV Community Link for welcoming me, taking the time to help me discover what occupational therapy can offer at this agency, and supporting my development as a student.

I wish you all the best! Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists What is occupational therapy? Working at HIV Community Link fits perfectly with my skill set as a psychotherapist and gives me a fabulous opportunity to further my knowledge, education and experience.

With a Masters of Counseling I am given the opportunity to enhance my two areas of specialization; bereavement and as a sex psychotherapist. The diversity, resilience and openness of the community members is a cherished aspect of my position. I appreciate the transparency, non-judgemental, open and welcoming work environment for both clients and staff. I am honored and often find myself humbled when clients share their stories and truly thankful to be a part of their journey.

She brings with her a combined 25 years of business experience working with and in various sized companies focusing on maximizing the value of those around her, providing thought leadership, and removing obstacles to enable growth.

Kevin feels very fortunate in having the opportunity to work for HIV Community Link, as he has seen what good they have done in the advancement of Harm Reduction in his hometown of Medicine Hat.

Janak is a public health researcher with a background in tropical medicine and global health. Janak is passionate about bringing change in the lives of people living with HIV by implementing programs related to harm reduction, health promotion and disease prevention. Janak is currently working on his Ph. Gord is a country boy at heart, growing up on the Southern Prairies of Saskatchewan.

Gord identifies as a Two Spirited Metis male. It has taken her six years to get to this level of trust and she loves it! Ana started her career in journalism in in Europe, where she enjoyed covering social and diversity issues. Katelyn is passionate about creating social change that positively impacts populations health.

She comes from a background in public health, she has experiences working in sexual health, harm reduction, and population health promotion. She also volunteered for 2 years before she became employed with the agency.

She enjoys her job very much, as she has met so many wonderful people over the last 18 years, staff and clients alike. She has watched the agency grow and change over the years always on top of any change and needs our clients require. Coral also coordinates the nutrition program.

Mark a has been living with HIV since He has traveled a long road from the time of no treatment options to the reality today that treatment works and undetectable equals untransmittable. He has done this in order to educate, inform with facts and work to remove the stigma and discrimination that remain entrenched at many levels of policy, law, community and service access points for people at risk for and living with HIV.

Kemi believes respectful engagement with local communities is critical to the success of any project and long term operations. Mike Miller leads the Health Technology practice for EY Canada as well as the Advisory Analytics practice for Alberta bringing over 15 years of experience in data management, data integration, health informatics and data analytics. He is passionate about helping organizations solve complex business problems through the use of enabling technologies.

Jack Janvier is an infectious disease specialist who is based out the Peter Lougheed Center. He did his internal medicine training at the University of Saskatchewan and then received his infectious diseases training at the University of Calgary. He has been working full time in Calgary since He has also been involved in an advisory role for collaborative teams looking at tackling the HIV epidemic in Aboriginal populations in Saskatchewan.

Jonathan M. Ablett is a business and real estate lawyer presently working with Quarry Park Law in Calgary. Jon obtained his degree with a dual area of concentration in both Management and Organizational Studies and Economics from the University of Western Ontario, and further completed his law degree at the University of Alberta in Edmonton.

He was called to the Alberta Bar in Jon enjoys outdoor activities of all kinds, and presently also volunteers with the Kerby Centre in Calgary. Presently, Mr. Andrew brings with him experience in the areas of finance, accounting, strategy and requirements development and implementation, as well as performance measurement and management. Andrew has broadened his experience by volunteering on, and consulting to, small business owners, boards of directors and steering committees in both for- and not-for-profit organizations and enjoys the variety of tasks and challenges these endeavours bring.

His belief is that any inherent challenges ought to be treated as opportunities to learn and grow. Matthews attributes much of his tenacity, leadership and team-based approach to many years of playing and coaching high-level, competitive sports.

In his spare time, Andrew enjoys playing sports, spending time with family and friends, and playing and listening to a wide variety of music. Sebastian Madrid is a professional in Continuous Improvement, Performance Management and Management Consulting specializing in optimizing business processes through the implementation of data analysis tools and information systems.

Sebastian has successfully fulfilled a wide range of business and technical functions and delivered complex projects in the energy, utilities and regulatory industries. Majoring in Management of Energy Business sparked his interest in the Canadian energy industry, which led him to Calgary in Sebastian also sits on the Board of Directors for YPE Calgary, a non-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting successful networking and development opportunities for over young professionals linked to the energy industry in Calgary.

She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology with Distinction from the University of Calgary and is an alumnus of the Leadership Calgary program Christine Gillies, MBA, is the Vice President of Marketing and Communications at Mitacs, a national non-profit offering research and development funding for companies to collaborate with universities. In her current role, she also oversees Alberta operations and public affairs in the province. As a community-oriented professional, Christine is committed to volunteering for a local organization that is advocating to improve quality of life for under-represented or marginalized populations.

His responsibilities focus on environmental legislation, regulatory affairs and environmental policy in the federal, northern and Alberta jurisdictions. In that capacity he worked extensively with federal and territorial governments on policy, legislative and regulatory developments, focused on providing solution-oriented issue management.

In addition to his professional work, Mike also volunteers with Shader Kids, a not-for-profit focusing on fostering youth leadership through outdoor experiences by helping kids attend summer camp. First, I will answer the burning question on your mind: What is occupational therapy? References: Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists Alexandra De Freitas.

Harm Reduction Outreach Worker. Team Lead, Prevention and Education. Gordon Laskey-Roest. Sipiwe Mapfumo. Ana Glavan. Katelyn Dickin. Jordan Kroschinsky. Coral Bush. Mark Randall. Kemi Awolusi. Mike Miller. Jack Janvier. Andrew Matthews. Sebastian Madrid. Leslie Hill. Christine Gillies. Mike Peters.

Occupational therapy hiv

Occupational therapy hiv

Occupational therapy hiv