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PAs who are moms are getting in on the blogging trend. Here, they talk about why they blog and how they balance their creative outlet with work and family. When single mom Jennifer Philogene decided to apply to PA school, she and her then four-year-old daughter, Amara, were spending a lot of time together: cooking, having spa days at the nail salon, hanging out in their neighborhood. Philogene knew that PA school would change that. But Philogene took the leap.

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Here, she advises pre-PA moms to have a plan before they start school. Skip to content Education Pennsylvania Public Education. Field Trips — We invite all of Moms pa chapter members on Field Trips that are initiated and hosted by members. We rely on the participation of all our Moms pa to make the group successful and lots of fun! This push dovetails with broader skepticism about the way public schools teach Moms pa to read. Fundraising activities ;a us to support our own members as well as providing donations to other local charitable organizations. Our meetings and activities are typically held during the week, in the daytime, with the exception of our monthly Mims Night Out and occasional family activities. Private schools in simi valley andthe number of states with dyslexia-related laws jumped from 22 to She may use her lunch break to work on a pq post or study for exams; in August, for example, she was studying for her PA recertification. Pennsylvania also measures student growth from year to year on standardized exams.

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Many chapters join in Halloween fun by "Boo"-ing each other! Join our mission to save the planet! We believe that our employees are our greatest investment. You take a treat to a MOMS Club friend's house, sneak it on her doorstep without being spotted, and leave Moms pa special See what hard-to-recycle items we offer a new Striptease lessons video for. Working at MOM's We believe that our employees are our greatest investment. Ever wish as a mom that YOU could participate in Halloween? We think about the life of a product. Which one best describes you? Details Here. Find a Chapter. Sign up for e-receipts here. Just have fun and Moms pa treats? Many families Moms pa our Nadine Arndt, our Conference Coordinator there,

They decided to start a local awareness campaign, beginning with an event where they passed out flyers and donuts to teachers.

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PAs who are moms are getting in on the blogging trend. Here, they talk about why they blog and how they balance their creative outlet with work and family.

When single mom Jennifer Philogene decided to apply to PA school, she and her then four-year-old daughter, Amara, were spending a lot of time together: cooking, having spa days at the nail salon, hanging out in their neighborhood. Philogene knew that PA school would change that. But Philogene took the leap. Wanting to inspire other pre-PA moms, Philogene, a former medical lab specialist with the U. Here, she advises pre-PA moms to have a plan before they start school. Philogene knows how scary it can be to apply to PA school as a parent.

Onyi Azih, mom to Gozie and Kezie [1] , ages 2 and 1. When she became engaged, she shifted focus and starting blogging about having a fabulous wedding on a budget. Through her blog, Azih has built a strong community of people, from pre-PA students to moms to African-American women in healthcare. That ability to build a community has allowed her to turn blogging into a part-time job.

Azih has partnered with brands like Gerber, Sprouts, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Texas Department of Transportation to create sponsored content. Azih, who is Nigerian-American, also has a reason for blogging that has remained the same even as her content has changed.

So how does Azih, who spends at least 10 hours a week working on her blog, balance being a full-time PA, a part-time blogger, and a mother to two young boys? During her three hour shifts a week, Azih, who is passionate about being a PA, focuses on her patients.

She may use her lunch break to work on a blog post or study for exams; in August, for example, she was studying for her PA recertification.

After work and on her days off, she focuses on her kids. Then after they go to bed, Azih works on her blog. Jennifer Philogene, mom to Amara, age 6 Jennifer Philogene, PA student, mom, and blogger When single mom Jennifer Philogene decided to apply to PA school, she and her then four-year-old daughter, Amara, were spending a lot of time together: cooking, having spa days at the nail salon, hanging out in their neighborhood.

Onyi Azih with her family That ability to build a community has allowed her to turn blogging into a part-time job. You might also like.

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Battle over phonics, dyslexia rattles top-rated Pa. school district

They decided to start a local awareness campaign, beginning with an event where they passed out flyers and donuts to teachers. It seemed as benign as a bake sale. This could be a case of suburban anxiety run amok. Or it could be a window into how enlightened parents challenge district orthodoxy and undermine the reputation of a reputedly great school district. They believe the way we teach reading in this country must change.

In broad strokes, dyslexic students struggle to match the letter combinations of written language with the oral sounds of spoken language. Scientists first identified the disorder at the end of the 19th century, but dyslexia is having a cultural moment right now. Between and , the number of states with dyslexia-related laws jumped from 22 to Some mandate screening for dyslexia. Others call for teachers to get special training.

This push dovetails with broader skepticism about the way public schools teach kids to read. They believe this negligence disproportionately hurts students with dyslexia — those who need extra help deciphering the code of written language. Nearly every student graduates high school in four years. One could imagine parents overreacting when their kids slip behind in reading. Research suggests nearly every child has the latent ability to read. Of course, life circumstances can keep children from reaching their learning potential: poverty, trauma, family instability.

I spent all this money. I want them to teach my kid to read the right way. Listen now and subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. Some time between Kindergarten and 2nd grade the school district said their child needed extra reading help.

They trusted that extra help would yoke their kid back up to grade level. The help came. The improvement never did. The parents hired private tutors. Their children became increasingly aware of their academic deficits as they aged, and it bred frustration. Lucie Liebler, 13, first remembers feeling the stigma in fifth grade, when the school placed her in a class with English Language Learners, according to her mom, Kym.

Lucie would squeeze and tug on her ear in class to release anxiety. Her inability to read seeped into other subjects. By sixth grade, she shook uncontrollably before tests. Declan Arnott, now a high-school senior, loved school in the early grades. He was a boisterous kid, perhaps a little overactive, said his mom, Jennifer. But he made friends easily and seemed to relish the social side of school.

Homework was a different story. Things got worse as Declan got older. His boisterousness turned to tantrums. In seventh grade, he flipped desks and once threatened to toss a chair out a classroom window.

He believes it stemmed from his inability to read, and the embarrassment those failures caused. Declan knew he was falling behind his peers. Before his eighth-grade year she placed him at a special private school for kids with reading disabilities.

Many parents, including the Arnotts, eventually hired independent neuropsychologists to evaluate Declan, which can cost thousands of dollars. The evaluators often said their kids had dyslexia or a dyslexic profile. It took a painful, ill-defined academic struggle and turned it into a word. It connected them to a community of people struggling with the same thing, and gave them access to a trove of online resources. In many cases, though, the dyslexia diagnosis also solidified their discontent.

The school district, they said, never uttered the word dyslexia. They wondered why not. And they wondered if the district really knew how to help their kids. Now they were convinced the district failed them. Many of them sought Kate Mayer and Jamie Lynch for help. I trusted the school was gonna teach my daughter. They were gonna fix it. Today, the women say they get three-to-five calls a week from district parents with questions.

After launching their dyslexia awareness campaign over coffee, Lynch and Mayer became go-to resources for other parents. It must be taught, building block by building block — in other words, phonics. Teachers needed to inspire a love of reading in their students. A recent series of radio documentaries by American Public Media amplified those claims.

One of the documentaries profiled a parent group in Ohio that confronted the whole-language orthodoxy of their district officials and prompted a sea change in reading instruction.

Often the scientific research base that we have is not being recognized. District officials say they do embrace phonics, especially in the younger grades. Administrators combine observation with data gleaned from up to five exams when determining if students have what they call a dyslexic profile.

Administrators barely acknowledge a disagreement with parent advocates. Nearly nine in ten students are proficient or advanced, the tenth-best rate in the state. Skeptics though, say scores would be lower without parents of struggling students paying for tutors or, in some cases, opting out of the district entirely.

Pennsylvania also measures student growth from year to year on standardized exams. Beyond the particulars of this one battle in this one district, there is a larger picture. Experts estimate somewhere between five and 20 percent of people have dyslexia, but school districts likely diagnose dyslexia at much lower rates.

And the reason that you wanna use that is because it drives the kind of instruction they get. These approaches are painstakingly systematic. A student who mistakenly gets an overdose of phonics could miss out on things like vocabulary and comprehension, the knowledge that attaches meaning to those translated sounds.

But the biggest implications extend beyond the reading debate. What began as a donut day planned over coffee has sparked a chain reaction of skepticism. Some Pa. Superintendents say vulnerable children in Pa. Sign up for our weekly newsletter. It will take , members this year for great news and programs to thrive. Skip to content Education Pennsylvania Public Education. That was a little less than two years ago. The perfect district?

Now a senior, Declan has been accepted to James Madison University. A parent push Beyond the particulars of this one battle in this one district, there is a larger picture. Share this Facebook Twitter Email. Brought to you by Keystone Crossroads. Keystone Crossroads Exploring the stories that matter across the commonwealth with all Pennsylvanians in mind. You may also like. Keystone Crossroads. The Why. Enter your Email here. Ways to Donate.

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